A Devastating Double-Bill: Thoughts on Elektra and Mahler 9 at Lincoln Center (part 2)

(To read Part 1 of this post, please click here.)  The Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic don’t get together in the offseason and plan out their repertoire as a team, so it was pure coincidence that Richard Strauss’ dark psychodrama, Elektra, opened at The Met the same weekend the Philharmonic was playing Mahler’s … Continue reading A Devastating Double-Bill: Thoughts on Elektra and Mahler 9 at Lincoln Center (part 2)

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A Devastating Double-Bill: Thoughts on Elektra and Mahler 9 at Lincoln Center (part 1)

  The Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic don't get together in the offseason and plan out their repertoire as a team, so it was pure coincidence that Richard Strauss' dark psychodrama, Elektra, opened at The Met the same weekend the Philharmonic was playing Mahler's bleak final symphony. Lincoln Center's coincidence was my good … Continue reading A Devastating Double-Bill: Thoughts on Elektra and Mahler 9 at Lincoln Center (part 1)

Buzz-Feeders: Why Art and Capitalism Should Play By Different Rules

A strange thing happened the other day: Bernie Sanders went to a performance of Hamilton. A presidential candidate going to a Broadway show isn’t the strange part. The strange part is *this* presidential candidate going to *this* broadway show. Bernie Sanders, champion of the people, advocate for the little guy…the man leading the assault on … Continue reading Buzz-Feeders: Why Art and Capitalism Should Play By Different Rules

LA Phil 2016-17: By the Numbers

I do this every year: leave the punditry to others and tally up the stats. Here's what 2016-17 looks like at the LA Phil. Unlike in years past, I have only included performances by the LA Phil--no visiting artists. 21 commissions, 14 world premieres, 5 U.S. premieres, and 5 West Coast premieres. This beats last … Continue reading LA Phil 2016-17: By the Numbers

How to Fix Classical Music

Money (1950). Lascivious musicians (1530). The gramophone (1930). Money (1969). Claude Debussy (1902). The violin (1740). Money (1683). YouTube (2013). Ludwig van Beethoven (1827). Money (1903). Popular music (1324). The compact disc (2009). Money (1987). Figured bass (1609). An aging audience (1960s-present). For centuries, classical music has been on the brink of death. Over the … Continue reading How to Fix Classical Music

A Classical Christmas

Let's face it, most Christmas music is lame. And it's that same lame Christmas music that gets blared over loudspeakers in shopping malls all across this great country of ours. Ask most people about classical Christmas music and they'll probably say something about that horrifying version of Pachelbel's Canon in D by an electronic group that … Continue reading A Classical Christmas